Uk Acts To Reduce Housing Bubble Fears

The Tennessee rockers’ sixth album was released on Monday (September 23) and has sold over 71,000 copies so far, beating off competition from Drake with his third album ‘Nothing Was The Same’ (Number Two) and Jessie J with her second album ‘Alive’ (Number Three). Drake’s first week sales tally of 61,000 has made the Canadian rapper’s LP the fastest selling hip-hop album of 2013, beating the opening sales of Kanye Wests ‘Yeezus’ (which sold 25,000 week one) and Jay Z’s ‘Magna Carta Holy Grail’ (39,000). Elsewhere on the UK Official Albums Charts, Arctic Monkeys slip three places to Number Four after two weeks at the top with ‘AM’. Jason Derulo completes this week’s Top Five with his third album, ‘Tattoos’ (Number Five). The album features his Number One single Talk Dirty FT 2 Chainz. Scottish electro pop trio Chvrches are went in at Number Nine with their debut album ‘The Bones Of What You Believe’. On the UK Official Singles Chart, Jason Derulo today claims a second week at Number One with his track Talk Dirty FT 2 Chainz, which features on ‘Tattoos’. The US R&B star ended Katy Perrys two week run at the top last Sunday with her comeback single, Roar, to score his third UK Number One, finishing the week 15,000 copies ahead of Roar, which slid to Number Two. OneRepublic climb one place to Number Three with ‘Counting Stars’, while Drake’s ‘Hold On We’re Going Ho’e FT Majid Jordan is up three to Number Four. Aviciis ‘You Make Me’ is a non-mover at Number Five.

UK retailers remove ‘staggeringly offensive’ mental health costumes from sale

Osborne: There’s no housing boom in UK George Osborne, the U.K.’s finance minister, says that while there is cause for concern, the U.K. is not in the midst of a housing boom. “The FPC’s assessment this week – in line with that of the Chancellor and the Governor – is that recent developments in the housing market represent a broadening recovery from low levels of activity, but that we must remain vigilant as that recovery progresses,” a Treasury spokesperson said. Help to Buy assists buyers with a 5 percent deposit on properties worth up to 600,000. The government provides the buyer with a 20 percent loan. Osborne’s proposals come at a time of growing backlash against the government’s flagship housing policy, introduced earlier this year to help first time buyers get on the property ladder. U.K. house prices increased by 0.9 percent in September from August and were 5 percent higher year-on-year, according to new figures released today by Nationwide, pushing the average house price in Britain to 172,127. “There are also signs that the pickup is becoming increasingly broad-based. For the first time since 2007, all 13 U.K. regions experienced annual house price growth in the third quarter of 2013, said Robert Gardner, Nationwide’s chief economist in a statement. “However, the southern regions of England continued to see the strongest rates of growth especially London, where the annual rate of growth reached double digits in the three months to September.” By CNBC’s Arjun Kharpal: Follow him on Twitter @ArjunKharpal

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“This was an unacceptable error and the product was withdrawn immediately,” she said in a statement. “We take our responsibilities very seriously which is why we will make a sizable donation to Mind.” Tesco also issued an apology, saying in a statement: “We’re really sorry for any offense this has caused and we are removing this product from sale.” Mental health charity Mind welcomed the withdrawal of the costumes, saying the retailers had shown themselves to be “extremely misguided” by offering them for sale. Slept in. Have @asda withdrawn their ‘mental patient fancy dress’ costume or are we going to organise a protest at HQ? #timetochange Alastair Campbell (@campbellclaret) September 26, 2013 Alastair Campbell “It is staggeringly offensive to the one in four of us affected by mental health problems and our families and friends, and troubling that some businesses are still so out of touch with the public mood,” spokeswoman Sue Baker said in a statement . However, Baker said the outcry the costumes provoked on the social media site Twitter was encouraging. “We hope this will urge Asda, Tesco and other retailers and manufacturers to review their processes and consider taste and decency on mental health grounds, to avoid fueling stigma and discrimination that are so damaging for large numbers of the population,” she said. Mind and the group Rethink Mental Illness run the Time to Change campaign to challenge mental health stigma and discrimination. One of the campaign’s supporters is Alastair Campbell, who was former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair’s media chief and who has publicly spoken of his battle with depression . Campbell was among those who tweeted his displeasure at the “brutally stigmatizing outfits.” “@asda and @tesco should sign up for one of the @mindcharity @Rethink_ @TimetoChange mental health training courses,” he tweeted . Campbell alleged that Amazon still carried mental health patient costumes and called for people to tweet the company, asking it to withdraw them. But in response to an inquiry from CNN, an Amazon spokesperson said: “The item you refer to is not available on Amazon.co.uk.” Soccer player and broadcaster Stan Collymore who has also spoken out on depression, also took to Twitter to criticize the stereotype he said Asda and Tesco’s costumes had promoted.

UK university drops investment in U.S. drone firm after protests

The University of Edinburgh has bowed to pressure from students and campaign groups and is withdrawing funding from Ultra Electronics . The company, headquartered at Greenford in Middlesex, makes navigation controls for the U.S. fleet of Predator and Reaper unmanned aerial vehicles . Armed with Hellfire missiles, they are sent on covert targeted killing missions against suspected terrorist cells in Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia. But according to the Bureau for Investigative Journalism at City University in London, more than 430 strikes since 2002 have killed at least 428 civilians, of whom 173 were children. Edinburgh University Students Association (Eusa) , the student environmental group People and Planet , and the human rights charity Reprieve launched a campaign for the university to disinvest in June . A response from the university issued under a freedom of information request had revealed an investment of 1,244,672 in Ultra Electronics at the end of 2012. According to the university, the investment has been under active management since then and has reduced to about 400,000. Having taken on board concerns raised by Eusa, we have taken the decision to disinvest in Ultra Electronics, a university spokeswoman told the Guardian. We are committed to socially responsible investment and are the first university in Europe to sign up to the UN principles of responsible investment . Edinburgh University has an investment portfolio of about 230m, the third largest in the UK after Oxford and Cambridge. Its money is invested in more than 100 companies, including Shell, Total, Tesco and Monsanto. The universitys move has been welcomed by campaigners, who are now urging disinvestment in fossil fuel companies. The process of cleaning up the universitys investments can and must be taken further to the issue of environmental responsibility, said Undine Schmidt from People and Planet. Catherine Gilfedder, from Reprieve, urged other institutions to follow Edinburghs lead.